Shopping cart - $0.00

You have no items in your shopping cart.

Shopping cart - $0.00

You have no items in your shopping cart.

WWI

  • America At Its Best: Liberty Memorial

    Home to the official World War I museum of the United States, the Liberty Memorial is a National Historic Landmark replete in both splendor and honor. Standing proud at 217 feet tall in Kansas City, Missouri, the spire is a memorial dedicated to the fallen soldiers of WWI. Majestic in its architectural style of classical Egyptial Revival, the limestone tower is etched with a winged lion on either side. Named Memory, the Eastern faced feline shields its face from the heinous past of the European battlefields while the Western faced lion called Future, covers its eyes from unseen eventualities. Simultaneously poignant and astonishing, at night the memorial emits orange illuminated steam, giving an illusion of a burning pyre while the tower balcony offers breathtaking views of the entire skyline. An official Cockpit USA See America destination of choice.

     

     

  • Movie Monday: The Blue Max

    Set on the Western Front during WWI, The Blue Max is a British war film which recounts the unceasing determination of a German fighter pilot from a humble background, against all class and status barriers to achieve the highly coveted Pour le Mérite. With his sights set firmly on attaining Imperial Germany’s highest military honor for valor, also known as the ‘Blue Max’, the young German Corporal Bruno Stachel swaps the trenches for the cockpit, joining the German Army Air Service and beginning his mission to shoot down 20 aircraft to win the medal. Directed by John Guillermin and starring George Peppard as the lead along with James Mason, Ursula Andress, Karl Michael Vogler and Jeremy Kemp, The Blue Max is an aviation movie which shows off old school film making at its best, making it perfect for history enthusiasts in every aspect! Cockpit USA approved.

  • History.com: Trench Warfare

    While it may be most known for its huge role in battle in WWI, trench warfare was first established during the American Civil War. With improvements in weapon technology resulting in greater accuracy of rifles and cannons, soldiers no longer needed to be on the ground level to fight at their best. Along with their guns, men carried shovels digging miles of elaborate trenches in which they sheltered, lived and fought from. We at Cockpit USA recently came across this short film from History.com on the evolution of trenches - check it out for an interesting look at the changing texture of warfare.

  • Movie Monday: The Lost Patrol

    An adaptation of Philip MacDonald’s novel Patrol, this WWI film tells the tale of eleven British cavalry regiment men led by Sergeant Victor McLaglen, lost and adrift in the Mesopotamian desert and slowly, but viciously being killed off one by one by an unseen enemy. Starring Boris Karloff, Wallace Ford, Reginald Denny, J.M. Kerrigan, Alan Macdonald and Victor McLaglen, The Lost Patrol is minimal in its visual execution by director John Ford but relentless in Max Steiner's relentless musical theme, which later went on to later be adapted into his score for the Warner Bros' classic, Casablanca. With edge-of-your-seat action a plenty and hide-behind-your-coach scenes in abundance, The Lost Patrol manages to make it into the Cockpit USA Movie Monday hall of fame!

     

  • History.com: 1916 Battle of Somme

    It was in the summer of 1916 that WWI was at the peak of its toil along the Western Front. With the English and French troops buried deep in trenches, determination to put an end to the bloody battle arose and a plan was masterminded to overrun the Germans over the Somme River. Under the command of Sir Douglas Haig, one of the most controversial war generals, the British were to take the lead in wiping out German forces by means of artillery bombardment then cross the desolate no man’s land to what would be assumed to be a devastated German opposition. However, what actually happened turned out to be quite different... This short documentary by History.com tells a vivid story with original footage of the soldiers at the time. Prepare to be amazed. We at Cockpit USA were.

  • History.com: Treaty of Versailles Ends WWI

    With the sole objective to prevent a future war, the much negotiated Treaty of Versailles was signed on 28th June 1919. Diplomats from the US, England and France came together in Versailles and after six months of compromise and debate, the peace treaty was in place. However, with the exclusion of Germany and a degree of revenge in mind, the peace terms instilled achieved the opposite effect of its intentions and began the undercurrent of vengeance which led to WWII. Check out this informative video courtesy of History.com which tells the tale behind the treaty and all it precipitated…

     

  • History.com: Coming Home From WWI

    With our HQ based in New York, we at Cockpit USA have an unceasing love for this great city which is why this mini History.com documentary has a special place in our hearts. Featuring a WWI veteran, this gentleman tells of the Easter Sunday on which he made his return to the Big Apple. Awaiting him and his fellow brave soldiers was a welcoming committee organized by the mayor, but amid the colors, music and pretty girls, the thing that impressed him the most was the Mother of Exiles – the iconic Statue of Liberty. Take a look!

  • Movie Monday: All Quiet On The Western Front

    Based on the novel of the same name by German writer, Erich Maria Remarque, All Quiet On The Western Front is a harrowing movie about the actualities of war. Told from the point of view of a group of German schoolboys freshly recruited into the army upon encouragement by a jingoistic teacher, the story reveals the human experience of the tragedies of battle rather than the conceptual heroics. Although not an uplifting film, the cinematic display of World War I as directed by Lewis Milestone deservedly won the very first Academy Award for Best Director and Outstanding Production. With stars such as Louis Wolheim, Lew Ayres, John Wray, Arnold Lucy and Ben Alexander this is a Cockpit USA 'one to watch' on a rainy day.

8 Item(s)